New York’s ‘taxi Of Tomorrow’ Deal With Nissan Voided By Judge

New York Taxi-of-Tomorrow Plan Struck Down by State Court

Lien pulled to a stop, and angry bikers surrounded his vehicle, hitting it and spiking its tires, police said. Lien stepped on the gas, plowing into three more bikers, including Mieses, who was critically injured. One of the bikers, wearing a helmet camera caught the dust-up on video, which later in an edited version appeared on the Internet. It showed the Range Rover stopping at a later point with the biker gang still in pursuit. A man, who police say was Sims, got off his motorcycle and opened Lien’s door, police spokesman Sgt. Carlos Nieves said Friday. Lien drove off with his door slightly open, but further down the road, traffic backed up, cutting off his path, and allowing the motorcyclists to corner him. A biker, who police identify as Chance, smashed the driver’s side window with his helmet. That’s where the video ended. Afterward, some of the bikers dragged Lien from the vehicle and beat him, police said. His wife and daughter were unharmed. Cop among the bikers An off-duty New York police officer was riding with the bikers Sunday and saw much of the confrontation that ended with five injured. But he didn’t step in, an official said. He also didn’t tell his superiors about what happened until Wednesday, the source said. The officer, who works undercover, is a member of the motorcycle club.

The decision is fundamentally wrong, because it was within the commissions authority to authorize the Taxi of Tomorrow, Michael A. Cardozo, New York corporation counsel, said in a statement. The city intends to appeal immediately, he said. Aside from its being by far the safest taxicab ever designed, the NV200 has superior legroom, a panoramic roof and a host of other comforts and amenities, Taxi and Limousine Commissioner David Yassky said in a statement. We remain committed to bringing it to the riding public. The Taxi of Tomorrow program is a plan by Mayor Michael Bloomberg s administration to standardize and expand the citys fleet of 13,237 yellow cabs with 15,237 yellow vans built by Nissan, of which more than 2,000 would be accessible for wheelchairs. The mayor is founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP. $1 Billion Revenue The Nissans, already being made, were to hit the streets Oct. 28. The program was slated to bring in more than $1 billion in revenue to the city. We are disappointed in the courts decision, but it will not prevent our plan to start upgrading the NYC taxi fleet with the Nissan Taxi of Tomorrow at the end of the month, Travis Parman, a U.S. spokesman for Yokohama, Japan-based Nissan, said in an e-mail. We are evaluating options for next steps regarding the exclusivity contract. The other part of the program is a fleet of green cabs that riders could hail in underserved areas of the city, including northern Manhattan and the boroughs of Brooklyn , Queens, Staten Island and the Bronx. Those cars have been on the streets since August.

New York City Marathon will not be stopped by shutdown, but starting line may change

By Nicole Lyn Pesce / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 12:33 AM New York City Marathon runners cross the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in 2000. If the government wont budge, 48,000 New York City Marathon runners might have to. The Nov. 3 race usually begins at Staten Islands federally run Fort Wadsworth Park, but Washington gridlock has shut down the starting line less than four weeks before the worlds most crowded 26.2-mile race kicks off. Oy vey, what would happen if they canceled two years in a row? asked runner Sally Cohen Stilwell, 39, still reeling from last years eleventh-hour marathon cancellation days after Hurricane Sandy hit. Debra L. Rothenberg for New York Daily News Runners head into Brooklyn after the start of the NYC Marathon in Staten Island. Race organizers vowed that the run will go on. RELATED: RUNNING DOC: DISSECTING ORTHOKINE AND PRP The marathon will proceed, a New York Road Runners spokesperson emailed. We have contingency plans to alter the runner staging area of the race. She didnt elaborate on how they plan to relocate tens of thousands of runners, volunteers, medics and security personnel from the 226-acre park, or whether the race would still start on Staten Island. Maisel, Todd Thousands run in the New York City Marathon each year, starting off in Staten Island and ending in Central Park.

The “Taxi of Tomorrow” initiative, which was to go into effect Oct. 28, would have required every new taxi to be a Nissan NV200. Nissan was given a contract worth an estimated $1 billion in 2011 after a competition. Manhattan State Supreme Court Justice Shlomo Hagler ruled that the Taxi and Limousine Commission had overstepped its authority. In part, he relied on the same legal argument that doomed Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s effort to ban large sugary drinks from city eateries, saying the commission had infringed upon the City Council’s powers. “The notion that New York City should have one exclusive ‘iconic’ New York City taxicab is a policy decision that is reserved for the City Council,” he wrote. The city’s chief lawyer, Michael Cardozo, said in a statement, “We believe the Court’s decision is fundamentally wrong, and we intend to appeal immediately.” When the 10-year contract was awarded, Nissan officials said they expected to provide as many as 26,000 vehicles to the city’s taxi fleet over the deal’s lifetime. Travis Parman, a Nissan spokesman, said the company was considering its options, but it would still sell the vehicle to interested fleet owners. “We are disappointed in the court’s decision, but it will not prevent our plan to start upgrading the NYC taxi fleet with the Nissan Taxi of Tomorrow at the end of the month,” he said. The ruling was the second time a state judge has blocked the plan, after Justice Peter Moulton in Manhattan ruled in May that the initiative failed to comply with city regulations allowing taxi operators to buy hybrid vehicles. The taxi commission then revised the plan to permit hybrid models until Nissan provides a hybrid version of the NV200. The lawsuit was brought by Evgeny Freidman, a major city fleet operator, and the Greater New York Taxi Association, who claimed the commission did not have the power to force taxi operators to purchase a particular vehicle.